join

Syntax

join(X,Y) or X<-Y

Arguments

X and Y can be scalar/vector/matrix/table.

Details

Merge X and Y. The result has the same data type as X.

Examples

If X is a scalar, Y can be a scalar/vector. The result is a vector.

$ 1<-3;
[1,3]

$ 4<-1 2 3;
[4,1,2,3]

If X is a vector, Y must be a scalar/vector. The result is a vector.

$ [1,2,3]<-4;
[1,2,3,4]

$ [1,2,3]<-[4,5,6];
[1,2,3,4,5,6]

If X is a matrix, Y must be a vector/matrix with the same number of rows as X. The result is a matrix with the same number of rows as X.

$ 1..6$2:3 <- [7,8];

#0

#1

#2

#3

1

3

5

7

2

4

6

8

$ (1..6$2:3) <- (7..12$2:3);

#0

#1

#2

#3

#4

#5

1

3

5

7

9

11

2

4

6

8

10

12

If X is a table, Y must be a table or a vector with the same number of rows as X. The result is a table with the same number of rows as X.

$ a=table(1..3 as x, 4.5 6.7 8.5 as y);
$ a;

x

y

1

4.5

2

6.7

3

8.5

$ b=table(700 500 800 as z);
$ b

z

700

500

800

$ c=join(a,b);
$ c;

x

y

z

1

4.5

700

2

6.7

500

3

8.5

800

$ a=table(1..3 as x, `IBM`C`AAPL as y);
$ b=table(172.3 25 106.5 as z);
$ c=a<-b;
$ c

x

y

z

1

IBM

172.3

2

C

25

3

AAPL

106.5

Related function: cj (cross_join)